Category Archives: saints

He weaves them with us.

saints-north-america
All Saints of North America  (Second Sunday after Pentecost)

 

 

Though in the Orthodox Church November 1st is not our day to remember “All Saints,” I wouldn’t want to miss the opportunity the western holy day affords, especially when Anglican priest Malcolm Guite has written a fitting poem,  Sonnet for All Saints Day. If you visit his site you might like to stay awhile and explore others of his lovely poems; for each one he posts an accompanying audio file of him reading his work. For that reason I’m sending you directly to his page, so you can hear the poet himself.

All of his riches are within.

On Sept 25th we are remembering St. Sergius of Radonezh, a Russian of the 14th century who “filled the wilderness with ceaseless prayer, and transformed the forest into a holy place of God.” From The Prologue of Ohrid I give you this sweet story:

A saint does not shine outwardly. All of his riches are within, in his soul. A peasant came from afar to the monastery to see St. Sergius. When he asked the monks for the abbot, they told him he was working in the garden. The peasant went to the garden, and there saw a man in poor, ragged clothes, digging like any other peasant on a farm. The peasant returned to the monastery dissatisfied, thinking that the monks had made fun of him. So, to make things clear, he asked again for the glorious holy father, Sergius. Just then, Sergius returned to the monastery, and welcomed the peasant, serving him at the table. The saint saw into the heart of his guest, and knew the low opinion he had of his appearance. He consoled him by promising that he would see Sergius in a little while.

A prince and his boyars then arrived at the monastery, and they all bowed low to St. Sergius, and asked his blessing. The monks then removed the peasant from the room in order to make room for the new guests. In amazement the peasant looked on from a distance, to see that the one he had sought had been nearby all the time. The peasant rebuked himself for his ignorance, and was greatly ashamed. When the prince departed, the peasant quickly approached the saint, fell at his feet and began to beg his forgiveness. The great saint embraced him and said to him: “Do not grieve, my son, for you are the only one who knew the truth about me, considering me to be nothing–while others were deluded, taking me for something great.”

sergius-of-radonezh-1899-mikhail-nesterov

painting by Mikhail Nesterov